Javier Hernandez - writer / artist / creator, "El Muerto"
Alternative Press Expo - Concourse Pavilion - San Francisco, CA - March 11, 2006
 
Javier Hernandez is the All-American Mexican. With his solid build, hearty laugh, and firm handshake, Javier is the guy you want to bring to the bar with you. But watch out for his solemn sarcasm. The switch from deadpan to smiles can be missed if you looked away for a moment. Javier recently has proven that success (depending on how you measure it) can come at any time. In five years’ time, he has done only two issues of his creation “El Muerto,” and yet garnered the interest in having a film made of it - starring Wilmer Valderrama of “That 70s Show.” Most people wait for years and many stories later to get anything even looked at. For Javier, this was a blessing that will hopefully bring more returns. We met up with him recently at the Alternative Press Expo in San Francisco to discuss his comic book, the film adaptation currently in post-production, and his Mexican heritage and its influence into his works. Somewhere along the chat, we also get a bit of Spanish language lessons, and some history and current events opinions about Mexican culture and heritage. As we began chatting, the A.P.E. show was already closing and the booths were being torn down, bringing the chat to more of a shuffle and heavy breathing between questions and answers, along with some snippier comments thrown here and there.

K2K: How did you get started in comics?
JH:
That’s a good question. (laughs) You’re going to edit all the dumb stuff out, I hope. How did I get started in comics? Do you mean reading them or drawing them?

K2K: Yes.
JH:
I started reading them when I was a kid. My brother had given me a box of Silver Age comics - Batman, Spiderman. So I got hooked on them. I loved the storytelling, the colorful spandexed superheroes kicking butt. Eventually when I got older, I was into art. The “Oh, I want to be an artist when I grow up.” So I was trying to learn fine art and such, but was more drawn to drawing comics. I was inspired also by friends of mine who were doing their own self-published books. I figured, “Hey, if they’ve done it, then I can do it too.”

K2K: Yeah, a lot of people think that way.
JH:
A lot of people think that way, but a lot of people don’t do anything about it.

K2K: Touché! So what’s your background as far as art?
JH:
I went to college and took some art classes, but I was never really disciplined enough to pursue the degree, the Fine Arts degree. I just wanted to get more training in drawing and such. I was influenced by my brother at an early age. Basically, because of my brother, I got into comics, and I think I started drawing because of him. I figured, “Well big brother is drawing, so I might as well try to draw too.” From an early age, I was always drawing.

K2K: What about writing?
JH:
Writing? That just came because I wanted to draw my own comic, but I also wanted to write my own comic. I never considered working with someone else as a writer. I basically had to will myself into being a writer.

K2K: Who are some of your favorite artists and writers while growing up?
JH
: Ah, my favorite questions. My favorite artists in comics have always been Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, and a lot of the other early Marvel comic book artists from the Silver Age. Stan Lee would have to be one of the biggest influences as a writer. Those were the early books that I grew up with. And they’re so damned good. I still love the same books to this day.

K2K: What do you currently do as a “day job”?
JH:
I’m a production artist. Which basically means I do separations for a screen printer.

K2K: Major company?
JH:
No. A small local company near where I’m from.

K2K: How many different comic book titles have you done?
JH:
Actually “El Muerto” is the only comic book title that I’m doing right now. It’s the only thing that I’m focusing on so far as a comic.

K2K: When did you start doing it?
JH:
I started “El Muerto” in 1998. I actually debuted it at an A.P.E. Con when it was still held in San Jose [California].

K2K: Why is the title “El Muerto” as opposed to “El Muerte”?
JH:
That’s correct because the “o” is masculine for the “dead man.”

K2K: If “a” is the feminine, then what would the “e” at the end make it?
JH:
Uh, OK. You got me on that. “E” would be the female.

K2K: I thought that “a” would be the female.
JH:
I’m not sure. I think it depends on the word. There’s not a “muerta” word. That’s not a word. On some words, the “e” would be feminine, and on other words it would be the “a.”

K2K: So the full title of the comic book is “El Muerto: The Aztec Zombie,” right?
JH:
Yes sir.

K2K: Where did you come up with the idea?
JH:
Gee. I’ve never been asked that before. (laughs) I wanted to do something specific with Aztec mythology, and I also wanted to do something specific with the Dia de los Muerto [Mexican holiday, Day Of The Dead] folklore. So that’s basically what was my starting point. How I got the idea of this guy getting his heart ripped out by the Aztec god, just happened.

K2K: How much influence did you have from “The Crow,” or even “The Punisher,” as far as the look of the character? Or even “Desperado.”
JH:
Actually I never thought about The Punisher at all.

K2K: I mention that because of the film poster for “El Muerto.”
JH:
Right, right. Well, it’s a skull logo that he’s got. “The Crow,” yeah I read that when it came out. Actually, when the movie came out, I bought the graphic novel. I really liked it. I wouldn’t say that my comic is based on “The Crow,” only because “The Crow” is a tale of vengeance...

K2K: And they’re both dead guys.
JH:
Yeah, they’re both dead. A lot of dead guys in comics. The Spectre. The Spirit. Anyway, visually it’s got the white face and the black suit. But if you look at the Day Of The Dead folklore, people paint the skull-face on them[selves], and then the black Mariachi was just a stylish element.

K2K: With the Day Of The Dead in L.A. is [film scorer / musician] Danny Elfman.
JH:
Yeah, yeah. I was a big fan of Oingo Boingo, and I listened to a lot of their music when I was working on the comic.

K2K: Have you ever worked with him or hung out with him?
JH:
No, I’ve never met Danny Elfman.

K2K: (Sarcastically) Yeah, he doesn’t do much these days. Maybe looking for a job. Him and that Tim Burton guy.
JH:
Yeah, he’s a big film composer now.

K2K: More often than not, do you find that you have to explain the title’s meaning?
JH:
Actually, the term “El Muerto,” when people see it, I’ll sometimes ask them if they know what it means. They kind of have an idea that he’s dead. So it might be hard to pronounce, but they have an idea of what it means.

K2K: What’s the basic premise of the story?
JH:
The basic premise is that Diego de la Muerte gets dressed up to go to the Day Of The Dead festival. So he’s dressed up in costume. On his way to the festival, he’s abducted by the Aztec god of death, Mictlantecuhtli. We call him Mick around the office to keep it simple. So he gets abducted.

K2K: I’ve read two different versions of the story. One was that he died and was the resurrected by the god of death. The other was that he was abducted and killed.
JH:
Well, the god abducted him. But to do that, he’s got to snatch him out of our Earthly plane. So to the people on the Earth it’s, “Oh, he’s dead.”

K2K: Why was he abducted?
JH:
The god took him to basically make him [Diego] an emissary for him.

K2K: And the reason?
JH:
That will be revealed in future issues.

K2K: Was the whole idea of doing this comic as a hobby or moneymaking endeavor?
JH:
That’s funny. Moneymaking endeavor in indie comics.

K2K: That’s why I ask the funny questions.
JH:
You’re a funny guy. I’m a funny guy. The reason I did it, because I wanted to get the story out. Obviously I’m not going to play the fact that I wasn’t hoping for money for it. But I was going to do this regardless. It’s more than a hobby. It’s a passion. It’s my art.

K2K: That will translate well into text. (laughs) (breathy) It was MORE than a hobby. It’s a passion. The Passion Of El Muerto.
JH:
Yeah, that’s right. (sings out a heavenly) Aaah!

K2K: Did you ever visualize this as being a movie?
JH:
Honestly? I always thought... I’m sure there was a time when I thought, sure, this would be great as a movie, or a cartoon, or action figures. But I didn’t sit there and do it as, “Alright, let’s knock this story out and get that big Hollywood deal.” That’s a pipe dream. Most people seem to follow it.

K2K: How did “El Muerto” get picked up to be made into a film?
JH:
Aah! The “story behind the story.” Let me get my smoking jacket, my ascot, and... (in a faux British aristocratic gruff tone) “Oh, well I’ve had a rather interesting life, as you know...” I did an interview on NPR some years back, on the floor of the San Diego Comic Con. They were interviewing some Latino artists, and I was one of the ones being interviewed.

K2K: Because... you are... Latino, in fact.
JH:
That’s right. They aired the episode a week or two later. As it turns out, Brian Cox, who is a writer/director/producer, heard the interview and was interested in the idea of “El Muerto.” He contacted me through the radio station, bought one of my comics and read it, and then set up a meeting with me. He wanted me to meet him. I figured, “Well, why would a director want to meet me?” So I met him. He had a lot of questions about the storyline, and some points he brought up. He was picking my brain and getting a feel for me. At the end of the conversation, he asked if I’d be interested in turning it into a film. I kind of paused for a second, tried to be cool. “Sure, let’s explore that.” Inside, I was jumping up and down. I told him, “Yeah, I’d definitely like to explore the possibilities.” So he got a hold of his friend Larry Rattner, a producer he was working with. Larry, by the way, produced “Dahmer,” which was nominated for three Independent Spirit Awards two years ago. So he told Larry, “I’d like to do this as a film. It has potential.” Larry looked at it and agreed. He’s an independent producer, so he needed money to start production. He was lucky that he had some investors. The Leones. Bruno Leone, and his sons, Dan and Rich. They were interested in doing a film with him. So he sold them on the idea of “El Muerto” at that time. No script at the time. He just sold them on the idea of financing the film.

K2K: Had any of them seen the comic book?
JH:
Yeah. He showed them the comic. They all saw the potentiality of making the film. So we eventually made a deal and Brian got to working on the script. He got the script done, through several drafts. He would always show me a copy of the current draft. We ended up getting our actors and film made.

K2K: Is this your first foray into films?
JH:
This is actually my first foray into films. I was an extra in “Spiderman,” in the wrestling scene. In the wrestling arena. I’m up there in the rafters, in the seats, with my friend [comic book artist] Rafael Navarro. So that might have been my first foray into film, but now they’re actually making a film from my comic.

K2K: Does the film play straight along your ideas and visions?
JH:
Yeah, the film is based on the first issue. The first issue is basically what happened, how he got abducted and sent back to Earth. So they needed to come out with a full story for a film. So he said, “Your comic is only the first act.” So he came up with a storyline of when he gets back, and what he does, and new characters. It’s definitely based on the comic and the origin.

K2K: Will your comic continue along the film’s storyline, or your own ideas?
JH:
My producers’ have asked me that. I told them, “No. Because the storyline you guys came up with is the movie.” I have my own storyline set in my mind. I’m finally getting that out.

K2K: Will the film possibly have a sequel? Does it have an open end?
JH:
Let me say, the movie was made and there’s a potential for a sequel. It definitely doesn’t have an “OK. That’s it. No more El Muerto.”

K2K: How much input did you have in the filmmaking aspect?
JH:
I was very fortunate with that. I mean, by now everybody agrees that [“Sin City” creator] Frank Miller has raised the bar as far as getting his own movie made. I was involved with the film from the beginning. Obviously I created the source material. The contractual arrangements on the film, I’m the Associate Producer on the film. I was hired to work on the film for six weeks. Two weeks pre-production and four weeks on set. So my director, every time he write a new draft, would send me a copy for my opinion. I sent notes back with what I thought. He would listen, but he had his idea of what he wanted to do. But he was always concerned that I was happy with what he was doing. Although I was very involved so far as being at the film every day. I had a cameo in the movie. Hopefully they’ll have an Academy Award category for Creator Cameos. Me, Stan Lee, and a couple of other guys will be up for that.

K2K: How did you like the cast and crew?
JH:
Very happy with the casting, and the crew was great to work with. The main actor, Wilmer [Valderrama, of “That 70s Show”] was... We’re lucky we got him. He brings a lot of attention to the project, by having him in the role.

K2K: And I heard he was concerned that you liked his performance.
JH:
Yeah, there was one time... It was his birthday. I went in his trailer to give him a birthday card that I had drawn up. I was leaving the trailer and he calls to me. He said, “Hey, Javier. Are you happy with how I’m playing the role.” I thought that was really cool that he was concerned.

K2K: The film has quite a cast collected. How did you manage to get them?
JH:
Our director Brian, when it came down to casting, he had a list of people he wanted for each role. It turned out to be very lucky to get Michael Parks, Tony Plano...

K2K: Give me a quick thought on the following actors... Maria Conchita Alonso.
JH:
When I found out she was on the film, I was blown away. I got to meet her. She plays a nun in the film, Sister Rosa.

K2K: Is she as cute in person as she is in pictures?
JH:
She’s actually cuter in person, and it was just great meeting her.

K2K: Angie Cepeda.
JH:
Angie Cepeda was really good. There were a lot of girls who came in to try out for that role. She hit it off best with Wilmer. She’s very hot, and a very good actress. The role calls for a lot of depth on that character. She’s not just screaming and being saved by the hero all the time.

K2K: Billy Drago.
JH:
When I found out Billy Drago was in, my first thought was, “Whoa! Frank Nitti.”

K2K: Wilmer Valderrama.
JH:
I met him actually several months before we started filming. I had a gallery showing in West Los Angeles. He came in, and had just signed on for the character. He came with his girlfriend at the time, Lindsey Lohan. So I’m in the gallery with family and friends. I see him walk in with his girlfriend and think, “Oh my God! Wilmer, and Lindsey?” So I told my producer to introduce us. I thanked him for jumping on board the project. He said, “Yeah. It’s great to be on board.” He actually bought a couple of my pieces that night.

K2K: Did Lindsey back into anyone’s car when she brought Wilmer? (laughs)
JH:
Nothing happened.

K2K: Brandon Molale.
JH:
He was really good. He played a state trooper. When I saw him, I thought, “Whoa! There’s Captain Marvel. Shazam.” Have you seen him? He would make a great Shazam. You know, this being my first time [making a film], I was surprised. All the actors were very gracious. When they find out that you’re the creator of the source material, it amazes me how gracious they are, and how respectful they are. To me, that was a big deal.

K2K: What about Nathan Mussell. He plays the god of death. This is his first film role.
JH:
Yeah, I saw that on IMDB too. He’s the puppeteer. The god of death is a puppet. He wore the harness. He’s not speaking. We have a voice for that, but I can’t discuss who that is at the moment.

K2K: Tony Plana.
JH:
Oh my. That guy brought so much class to the role, and depth to the character. For me personally, I wouldn’t say that he steals the picture, but he gives the most profound performance in the film.

K2K: Michael Parks. I just saw him listed on a “Where are they now” website. The guy is always busy, so I don’t see how he’s on there.
JH:
When I found out he was in it, I though how lucky we were. I actually picked him up on the first day of filming. We were short a P.A., so they asked me and I said, “Sure.” He got in the car. I said, “Hi. I’m Javier Hernandez. I don’t know if they told you, but I’m the creator of the comic.” He started looking at the script, “Oh, yeah.” He was great.

K2K: What’s the plan now? You mentioned that you were going to bring this film to film festivals first? Are you hoping for a major release at some point? Are you expecting it or hoping more for art house release?
JH:
That’s an honest question. We’re looking for a release. I don’t know exactly what my producer was looking for. Actually, I think we are looking for major distribution. I used to think on my own that it would be cool to be art house. It gives it this cool badge of honor. But major distribution is great. We all want that.

K2K: Who would you like to pick it up?
JH:
Lion’s Gate is someone I’d think about in picking the film up and doing good promotion.

K2K: Any plans on doing an animated version?
JH:
Nothing set right now. But we’re definitely looking at exploring getting into animation, video games...

K2K: Action figures. McFarlane Toys.
JH:
I personally would love that. Wilmer’s actually a big Spawn fan. He’s got a lot of figures at the house. I told him to let Todd know that we have an “El Muerto” fan here.

K2K: I’ve seen some really cool posters of the film when looking online. Can anyone get those?
JH:
Thank you, sir. Currently we don’t have any merchandise available, like images or posters. Nothing available for the movie yet. There are comic book images that are available to buy.

K2K: Ah yes. Those are available at...
JH:
El Muerto.com

K2K: (looking through questions) This gets better.
JH:
You have opinions of your own work. I like that. “It gets better.” That’s awesome.

K2K: The original idea of the story of “El Muerto,” do you see it as an ongoing story, or does he have a planned ultimate demise, like “Spawn”?
JH:
Ooh, I couldn’t answer that last part of the question. (wink, wink) The comic? Oh yeah, it does have an end. And I don’t mean like just the last issue. But I’d have to kill you if I told you.

K2K: So to point this out, you’ve only done two issues of “El Muerto.”
JH:
Well, you don’t want to point that out, but yeah... (laughs) The Sistine Chapel, you know, was made over several decades, I understand.

K2K: So you could become famous after you’re dead.
JH:
(in reference to having to walk quite a distance to his car) The way we’re going now, it could happen in another 20 yards.

K2K: So you did two issues of “El Muerto” and then had it made into a film. That’s almost unheard of. How is the jealousy backlash from your peers?
JH:
Here’s the unheard of part. There was actually only one issue of “El Muerto,” and it was actually a photocopied ‘zine. So the backlash is probably going to get worse as we go on... for the next 20 yards.

K2K: You did two comic issues in five years. That’s worse than [“Rocketeer” creator] Dave Steven’s track record. Will you be speeding up the process now on creating your comics?
JH:
Oooohhh... Yes, I’m half way through the third one.

K2K: Tell me about “Manga Muerto and Skeletron.”
JH:
Oh. The “Manga Muerto” was just a thing I wanted to do to exersize my Gonagai Mazinger...

K2K: Your gonad what? (laughs)
JH:
“Manga Muerto” was something that I did for fun, in the spirit of Japanese comics and TV shows that I grew up with. “Giant Robot” and such. “Manga Muerto” wasn’t meant to save the world nor win the Pulitzer Prize.

K2K: What is “Weapon Tex Mex”?
JH:
That was just a fun idea. I did a story for “Hot Mexican Love Comics.” They asked me if I wanted to contribute. I was still working on “El Muerto” at the time, so I said, “Let me do this three page story with Weapon Tex Mex dude.” It was just a fun romp on [Marvel Comic’s] Weapon X.

K2K: Is this a mutant hero who makes good salsa?
JH:
No. He was just a big, burly man-bull.

K2K: You have mentioned before that there are “interested parties” asking about other ideas that you have. Shed some light on those.
JH:
Yeah. I have another comic idea that I’ll be developing when I get through the latest “El Muerto.” “The Eclectics.” People can read about that on my message board.

K2K: Which is available at...
JH:
El Muerto.com

K2K: On to your culture. How or why is it important to maintain your own cultural legacy in your stories, as opposed to having a nondescript character?
JH:
When I set to do the comic. I wanted to do my own comic book story, and create my own character. It wasn’t even a question of what cultural background he would be. For me, it was that he would be Mexican-American. It’s what I am. I didn’t want to write about something that I’m not, if that makes any sense.

K2K: As Mexican culture provides so much color and folklore, how important is it to bring more of that to a forefront in America?
JH:
I think it’s very important. I think it’s important that Mexican-American creators do stuff that reflects who they are.

K2K: Do you personally think that bringing - not just Mexican, but - different cultural ideas and medias to America will help add to the soup?
JH:
That’s a really good question, expressly like at this very minute. I think it’s absolutely important that our society, America, sees different cultures and people and things, in popular entertainment - in pop culture. It should be a reflection of what’s out there in reality.

K2K: Or do you think that America still has more of an “us and them” mentality regarding cultures, even within their own neighborhoods?
JH:
I think America does. These are really good issues, because people discuss these subjects on my board a lot. To me, it’s important that we’re different. For example, you and I. We’re different for other reasons, but even the differences doesn’t mean that you and I are better than one another. Some people want people to be generic or... unified. Blended. Everyone’s gotta be blended. OK, you’re Mexican, or Black, whatever, but you’re an American. But in the same body, I think I am an American, but I’m a Mexican-American or whatever I want to call myself. So I think we have a lot of issues in this country. Us vs. them. Are you American? Are you not? Do you act like a “real” American?

K2K: Then again, what’s a “real” American?
JH:
Yeah, there’s questions after that. Were you born here? Does that make you American? Or did you come here from another country, but you’re a productive citizen or whatever. Those are a lot of great questions.

K2K: What do you think about the whole current immigration issue?
JH:
The whole immigration thing... In regards to your question of “us vs. them”. They’re here for a reason. The reason being... Like for me, I don’t want to do a lot of that work. I try not to say it’s a White or Brown issue, but I don’t want to do that work. I want to do my silly comic and... So they’re here, and we want to deal with them by throwing them out now. Yet, who let them in here? They “snuck in,” but who hired them? I think Americans who like running businesses and making money, and there’s nothing wrong with that, hired them because they can make more money that way. So I find it more complicated than “Oh they snuck in, and now throw them out.”

K2K: As you travel to different conventions, do you find that there are particular areas that are more open to your comic book being Mexican in culture?
JH:
Most of the places that I’ve exhibited at, whether they’re signings, book fairs, comic conventions, have coincidentally been in areas where populations have been 30, 40, 50% Latino. Although my audience for my book is all groups. It’s just people who are interested in Independent comics, in Latino culture, the Day Of The Dead culture, or the Aztec culture. I wouldn’t call my book a Latino book only for Latino audiences, because it’s not.

K2K: Everyone has folklore. This just happens to be that one.
JH:
Yeah. And there’s something about the Day Of The Dead folklore. It’s very particular, very unique. It has a lot of...

K2K: It’s colorful. It’s not evil.
JH:
That’s whole other ongoing battle when I discuss Day Of The Dead with people. “Oh, that thing.” It’s offensive when people say it’s Satanic.

K2K: I’ve never really seen anyone calling it that. To me, it shows a sense of Mexican culture being friendly, nicer, and respectful to each other. There is no sadness in the Day Of The Dead. Mexicans, culturally, respect and appreciate people in memory differently than some White cultures. Some White cultures frown on death. It’s sad, you’re gone. It’s more of a selfish attitude. Day Of The Dead celebrates people.
JH:
It is a celebration. I use this line for my character in my new book. He says, “I hate when people think that Dia de los Muertos is the Mexican Halloween.” It’s more like the Mexican Valentine’s Day if I have to give someone an analysis. The person’s gone, but I still love them.

K2K: All the costumes, the skeletons are cartoonish.
JH:
That’s the thing. When you think of skeletons, people think, “Oh, that’s Satanic.” I’ve had people, where I live in Whittier [California], civic leadership... If you mention, “Let’s have a Day Of The Dead Festival,” because of the people who live there. Some guy actually said, “Ooh, that’s Satanic.”

K2K: The Devil is mentioned in the Bible. Does that make Christianity Satanic?
JH:
That’s a good point. These are all really good issues. We’ll have to talk about this further.

K2K: How old are you now?
JH:
39.

K2K: Now that you’re about to hit superstardom - are you married or single?
JH:
Single. Depends on what you read on MySpace.

K2K: MySpace lists you as being a Swinger. True, or tease?
JH:
Um, I’m going to have to email Tom of MySpace about that. It must be a glitch.

K2K: How’s MySpace working for you?
JH:
Fine. It’s a great supplement. I’ve had old friends look me up because they read about me in a local paper. On MySpace is meet people I’ve never met before?

K2K: Met any hotties?
JH:
I haven’t found out if they’re real yet.

K2K: How is it for business?
JH:
For business it’s good. A word I just learned recently - Branding - my icon is always showing on MySpace. People see it and they’re interested and look at my site. They learn about my comic and work. If I don’t actually sell a book from it, it’s in their heads. So when the movie comes out, “Oh, that’s that guy’s comic.” And it’s free, so for me it’s a no-brainer to have a MySpace page. And I dedicate my MySpace page to promoting my comic and art.

K2K: What is your primary audience - male or female?
JH:
That’s a really good question. I thought about this answer. I would say about 40% of my audience is female. Now, if you know anything about comic book statistics, audiences are usually like the movies - 35 year old white males. So on that note, I’m glad that I have a diverse audience.

K2K: What was it like growing up in East L.A.?
JH:
I grew up there only for about 3 years. They I moved to Whittier. It’s been great there. I guess it was heavily Latino, so I never really encountered any “outsider” status, like being the only brown guy in the neighborhood.

K2K: Tell me about the classes you teach.
JH:
I teach a comic book workshop at the Pico Rivera Center For The Arts. I’ve been teaching there for about two years. Basically I’m teaching the 13, 14, 15 year olds who take the class. It’s a five week class. I just show a basic comic book layout. It’s not a drawing class, where I teach them how to draw. I’m not interested if they’re good drawers or not. I’m just showing them how to do a comic book story. I’m showing them the panel layout, sequential story time techniques...

K2K: Is it rewarding for you?
JH:
Yes. It’s very rewarding for me, just learning about storytelling and how young people are very heavily tuned into... particularly the Manga storytelling. For them it’s a total language. I don’t know if you’re familiar with Manga but, if a character gets aroused, there’s a drop of blood on his nose, or if they get mad they get certain marks. And they know every step. It’s very expressive with emotions.

K2K: How can anyone sign up for classes?
JH:
Oh, they can just sign up by calling the Center For The Arts. They’re five-week classes, every Tuesday from 5:30 pm to 7 pm.

K2K: Any age or just kids?
JH:
Right now we have it set up for kids. There are issues about having adults, with kids in the class. But if we get enough adults, then we could have an adult class. Right now it’s just 13 - 18.

K2K: Any last words before we go?
JH:
None that I can think of. We’ve covered a lot of good stuff.

It was long past the closing time of the A.P.E. Con, and with that, we all got in our respective cars and took off. My trip being a bit closer than Javier’s travel home. Look for “El Muerto” the film later in 2006.
 
Written by Philip Anderson

Philip Anderson is a musician, in addition to being a writer/photographer. He has performed as a guitarist/vocalist, as well as songwriter, in several bands over the past 20 years. As a writer and photographer, he has been published by several magazines and in several books, and had his works appear on television.

All rights reserved © KAOS2000™. No portion contained herein, either text or graphics, may be reproduced anywhere or reposted on any other website for any purpose without the expressed permission of the publisher. All violations shall be punished as the law allows.

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